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CfP: Natures and Spaces of Enlightenment

CfP: Natures and Spaces of Enlightenment (The David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies XVI)

13-15 December 2017, Griffith University and the University of Queensland

A preoccupation with the idea and use of ‘nature’ was an important characteristic of the Enlightenment. Long considered a pivotal moment in the development of modernity, the Enlightenment is now also regarded as a turning point in the emergence of the Anthropocene, as new conceptions of the relationship between human society and the natural world influenced all manner of discourses and practices, from politics to aesthetics, theology to botany, gardening to pet-keeping, and industrial production to colonial governance. But the meanings and purposes of nature were heterogeneous, giving rise to a number of diverse Enlightenments. As an intellectual movement as well as a social process, which varied according to geographical region, the Enlightenment was experienced in different ways by different peoples in different places. Placing emphasis on feeling no less than reason, it also took different forms in different genres of art and writing. And this plurality multiplied as the reach of European empires grew and Enlightenment attitudes and activities migrated to new spaces, where they were transformed by local circumstances. Far from being a monolithic phenomenon, the Enlightenment comprised a cluster of interacting but opposing tendencies, from nationalism to globalism, secularism to revivalism, liberalism to conservatism, and libertine excess to moral reform.

The David Nichol Smith Seminar is the official conference of the Australian and New Zealand Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies. In 2017, it is generously supported by the Griffith Centre for Social and Cultural Research; the School of Humanities, Languages and Social Science, Griffith University; the Enlightenment and Romanticism Research Network, Griffith University; the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, University of Queensland Node; the Institute for the Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Queensland; the Sydney Intellectual History Network, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Sydney; and the National Library of Australia.

The Australian and New Zealand Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies invites you to the sixteenth David Nichol Smith Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Studies, hosted by Griffith University and the University of Queensland. We welcome proposals for papers or panels on the theme ‘Natures and Spaces of Enlightenment’, broadly conceived as referring to the plurality of Enlightenments as well as the ideas and uses of nature which they endorsed, and the spaces in which they developed. In the inclusive spirit of the David Nichol Smith Seminar, proposals may address any aspect of the long eighteenth century. Especially relevant topics include:

  • Enlightenment and religion, science, empire or gender
  • Popular, moderate and radical enlightenments
  • Regional, national and global enlightenments
  • Climate, the environment and the Anthropocene
  • Emotion, sentimentalism and the language of feeling
  • Theories of human nature and civil society
  • Improvement and social utility
  • Travel, exploration and discovery
  • Trade and commerce
  • Philanthropy and the culture of moral/social reform
  • Spaces of sociability such as clubs, salons, coffeehouses and taverns
  • Urban and rural spaces
  • Ideas of landscape and forms of land use
  • Nature in art, literature and music
  • Natural history, natural philosophy, natural law and natural theology
  • Nature in economic and political writing
  • Nature, medicine, sexuality and the body
  • Botany, geology and geography
  • Representations and uses of animals
  • Work, leisure, technology and industrialisation

We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers and panels comprising 3 x papers. Please submit an abstract of 250 words (maximum) and a 2-page CV, as PDF documents, to the following email address by 1 August 2017: dnsconferenceqld@gmail.com.

Please note that participants must be current members of ANZSECS.

For more information, please see the conference website.

 

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Workshop on Crises of Meaning and Political Theology

Workshop on Crises of Meaning and Political Theology

6 June 2017, University of Oxford

The ‘Crisis, Extremes and Apocalypse’ research network at TORCH is delighted to host a workshop on ‘Crises of Meaning and Political Theology’ on the afternoon of 6 June.

Speakers will include:

  • Martin Ruehl (Cambridge), “Ernst Kantorowicz and the Politics of Political Theology”
  • Amir Engel (Hebrew University), “On Real and Imagined Catastrophes: Gershom Scholem’s Sabbatinism.”
  • Julia Ng (Goldsmith’s), “Surrealism’s Political-Theological Afterlife: Benjamin—Blumenberg—Taubes.”
  • Carolin Duttlinger (Oxford), ”Rescue in the Face of Danger: Benjamin, Goethe, Sebald”
  • Hjalmar Falk (Oxford/Gothenburg), “The Modern Epimetheus. Carl Schmitt’s Marian Katechontism”
  • Jean-Claude Monond (ENS), ‘”Progress, Providence, Eschaton: Löwith, Blumenberg, and After”

All are welcome. Coffee, tea and biscuits will be provided. For information, please contact Audrey Borowski at audreyborowski@yahoo.com or visit http://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/clone-sacrifice-revisited.

Open to all
Tuesday, June 6, 2017
1:00pm to 7:00pm
History Faculty, George Street, 41-47 George St, Oxford OX1 2BE
Lecture Theatre, University of Oxford, UK

For more information, please see the conference website.

 

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Workshop: Hume’s Thought and Hume’s Circle

Workshop: Hume’s Thought and Hume’s Circle

22 June 2017, IASH, University of Edinburgh

A workshop on this subject will take place in the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH), University of Edinburgh on 22 June 2017 (1.45 pm–5.50 pm). The participants include Thomas Ahnert, James Harris, Catherine Jones, Robin Mills, Nicholas Phillipson, and Felix Waldmann. Attendance is free, but pre-registration is required. Please email iash@ed.ac.uk to pre-register. The workshop is funded by the Susan Manning Workshop fund (IASH) and the University of Edinburgh Eighteenth-Century and Enlightenment Studies Network.

Further information is available on the conference website.

 

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CfP: Histories of Anthropology: Transforming Knowledge and Power (1870-1970)

CfP: Histories of Anthropology: Transforming Knowledge and Power (1870-1970)

18-19 September 2017

“Histories of Anthropology: Transforming Knowledge and Power (1870-1970)” will be held at the University of Cambridge on 18-19 September 2017. The conference committee is currently accepting abstracts (max. 300 words) until 20 May 2017. The remit for the conference is broad and covers all aspects of the history of anthropology, but we are especially interested in receiving proposals for papers on transnational and trans-colonial perspectives on the modern history of anthropology. Abstracts or questions can be emailed to the conference committee at anthropology.history.cambridge@gmail.com. We encourage submissions from academics at any stage of their careers. Accepted papers will be announced by early June and limited funding will be available to support travel and accommodation. A teleconferencing ability will also be present if participants are unable to travel.

Submissions Due: 20 May 2017

 

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CfP: Political Philosophy and its History: Leo Strauss and Beyond

CfP: Political Philosophy and its History: Leo Strauss and Beyond

6-7 December 2017, KU Leuven

Leo Strauss is widely considered one of the most influential and controversial thinkers of 20th century. He is best known for providing insightful and challenging studies of several canonical thinkers in the history of political philosophy (Plato, Aristotle Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche etc.) but also for his illuminating analyses of less conventional thinkers that he included in the canon (Thucydides, Xenophon, Lucretius, Marsilius of Padua, Moses Maimonides, Al Farabi etc.). Strauss’ approach to the history of political philosophy is based on some assumptions that have been controversial: the idea that there is a ‘perennial’ dialogue among great philosophers, the querelle between classical and modern philosophy, the
relationship between esoteric and exoteric writing, the tension between reason and revelation. Reflecting on Strauss’ thought leads us to ask questions that are crucial for political philosophers: what is the relationship between political philosophy and its history? Is there a specific philosophical way to study the history of political ideas? What is the relevance of the theological-political problem in political philosophy and its history?

This call for papers​ aims to address these questions, welcoming papers that will explore the relationship between political philosophy and its history in Leo Strauss and/or alternative perspectives. Strauss’ methodology was developed in contrast to more ‘classical’ approaches to the history of political philosophy (for example Hegelianism, Marxism, Collingwood’s history of ideas, Nietzsche’s genealogies) and can be compared to other contemporary approaches to the history of political ideas. We accept papers from any period and discipline. Topics can include, but are not limited to:

  • Strauss and classical theorists of philosophical history (Hegel, Marx, Collingwood, Heidegger, Nietzsche, Cassirer etc.)
  • Strauss and his contemporary fellow philosophers (for example Arendt, Popper, Schmitt, Aron, Berlin, Gilson, Gadamer etc.)
  • Comparisons between Strauss’ and other perspectives on the history of political ideas (hermeneutic, phenomenology, genealogy, post-structuralism, Begriffsgeschichte, Cambridge school)
  • The relationship between reason and revelation in classical and modern political philosophers
  • Comparisons between ancient/medieval and modern political philosophers
  • Case-studies of esoteric-exoteric writing in the history of political philosophy
  • The theological-political problem in political philosophy
  • Questions such as: is there a specific philosophical way to do history of political philosophy? What is the relationship between political philosophy and its history?

This conference is organized by RIPPLE, the research political philosophy group at KU Leuven’s Institute of Philosophy. To submit a paper proposal, please email a short CV and abstract of no more than 500 words (along with affiliation) to strauss@kuleuven.be by 30 June 2017. Successful applicants will be notified by 20 July 2017.

The keynote speakers are Arthur Melzer (Michigan State University); Daniel Tanguay (University of Ottawa); David Janssens (Tilburg University).

 

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Conference Programme: Fractured States in the History of Political Thought

Conference Programme: Fractured States in the History of Political Thought

29-30 June 2017, University College London

We are pleased to announce that the programme for the 8th Annual London Graduate Conference in the History of Political Thought on ‘Fractured States’ is now available to download. The conference will feature a keynote lecture by Annabel Brett (Cambridge), opening remarks from Richard Bourke (QMUL), and a concluding roundtable with Valentina Arena (UCL), Quentin Skinner (QMUL), Richard Bourke (QMUL), and Nicola Miller (UCL). The conference is free to attend, but registration is essential.

To register, please see the conference website.

 

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Conference: Sacrifice revisited

Conference: Sacrifice revisited

19 May 2017, University of Oxford

A revisitation of the concept of Sacrifice in late modernity in its various configurations, philosophical and ideological. A conference of the Crisis, Extremes and Apocalypse – CEA Research Network. With Dr Faisal Devji (St Anthony’s), Dr Leader Maynard (Politics), Dr Brad Evans (Bristol), Professor Kalypso Nicolaidis (Politics), Professor Martin Crowley (Cambridge), and Professor Kimberley Hutchings (QMUL).

Papers include:

Faisal Devji (Oxford): ‘Gandhi, Sacrifice and the Ambiguities of non-violence’
Martin Crowley (Cambridge): ‘Bruno Latour’s Anti-sacrificial Politics’
Kalypso Nicolaidis (Oxford) ‘Meanings of ‘Sacrifice’ in Brexit Mythology’
Brad Evans (Bristol) ‘The Violence of an Artificial Love’
Jonathan Leader Maynard (Oxford) ‘Consequentialist Extremism: Present Sacrifices for Future Dreams in the Justification of Violence’
Kimberley Hutchings (QMUL) ‘On Violence, Gender and Sacrifice: old stories and new reflections’

Audience members who would like to join the speakers for dinner after the workshop should email audreyborowski@yahoo.com.

For more info, please see the website.

 

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CfP: The Impact of Learning Greek, Hebrew and ‘Oriental’ Languages on Scholarship

CfP: The Impact of Learning Greek, Hebrew and ‘Oriental’ Languages on Scholarship, Science, and Society in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance

13-15 December 2017, Leuven Collegium Trilingue

In 1517, Leuven witnessed the foundation of the Collegium Trilingue. This institute, funded through the legacy of Hieronymus Busleyden and enthusiastically promoted by Desiderius Erasmus, offered courses in the three ‘sacred’ languages Hebrew, Greek, and Latin. LECTIO (Leuven Centre for the Study of the Transmission of Texts and Ideas in Antiquity, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance) seizes the 500th anniversary of the foundation of the Leuven Collegium Trilingue as an incentive both to examine the general context in which such polyglot institutes emerged and—more generally—to assess the overall impact of Greek and Hebrew education, by organizing a three-day international conference. Our focus is not exclusively on the sixteenth century, as we also welcome papers dealing with the status and functions accorded to Greek, Hebrew, and other ‘Oriental’ languages in the (later) Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period up to 1750. Special attention will be directed to the learning and teaching practices and to the general impact the study of these languages exerted on scholarship, science and society.

The keynote speakers are: Luigi-Alberto Sanchi (Institut d’Histoire du Droit Paris) and Saverio Campanini (Università di Bologna)

Participants are asked to give 20-minute papers in English, German or French. To submit a proposal, please send an abstract of approximately 300 words (along with your name, academic affiliation and contact information) to lectio@kuleuven.be by 30 April 2017.

Please visit our website for the full CfP.

 

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Conference: Gli illuministi e i demoni / The Enlightenment and the Devil

Conference: Gli illuministi e i demoni / The Enlightenment and the Devil

26-27 May 2017, Colloquio Internazionale di Studi, Rovereto

Gli illuministi e i demoni. Il dibattito su magia e stregoneria nel Trentino del Settecento e i suoi legami con l’Europa. A metà Settecento Rovereto e l’Accademia degli Agiati furono al centro di una delle principali controversie sul sovrannaturale di tutto l’Illuminismo. Furono stampati trattati e scambiate corrispondenze sul rapporto tra scienza e magia, sull’esistenza della stregoneria, sui poteri e la natura di demoni, fantasmi e vampiri. Questo dibattito non fu isolato, ma si sviluppò nel contesto di una più ampia discussione europea, che ben restituisce la quintessenza del messaggio dell’Illuminismo e nacque sulla scia delle ‘nuove filosofie’ di Descartes, Bekker e Leibniz. Il convegno si propone di offrire alcuni contributi su aspetti finora trascurati e sulle fonti e ricezione del dibattito trentino, ponendolo in relazione con il contesto europeo a cui è collegato.

The Enlightenment and the Devil. The Debate on Magic and Witchcraft in 18th-century Trentino in the European Context.

In the mid-eighteenth century, one of the major controversies of the entire Enlightenment regarding the supernatural took place at the Accademia degli Agiati in Rovereto. For several years, treatises were printed and correspondence was exchanged on the relationship between science and magic, on the existence of witchcraft, and on the powers and nature of demons, ghosts and vampires. The debate did not take place in isolation but developed in a wider European context, which represents the quintessence of the message of the Enlightenment and originated from the “new philosophies” of Descartes, Bekker and Leibniz. The aim of the conference is to offer some contributions on the debate in Trentino, on its sources and aftermath and on aspects that have been neglected up to now, relating the North Italian debate to the European context it has connections to.

Speakers: Federico Barbierato (Verona), Antonio Trampus (Venice), Serena Luzzi (Trento), Wolfgang Rother (Zurich), Nicola Cusumano (Palermo), Bernd Roling (Berlin), Stefano Ferrari (Rovereto), Riccarda Suitner (Erfurt), Michaela Valente (Rome / Molise), Christian Zendri (Trento), Francesco Paolo De Ceglia (Bari), Edoardo Tortarolo (Vercelli)

For further information, please see website.

 

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Conference: What happened with A.C. Crombie’s “magnum opus” on the Philosophy of Galileo and Mersenne?

What happened with A.C. Crombie’s “magnum opus” on the Philosophy of Galileo and Mersenne?

9 June 2017, Trinity College, Oxford

Recently, Dr. Filip Buyse discovered in the archives of Trinity College Oxford a substantial typescript (of over 2000 pages) composed by Professors Alistair Crombie and Adriano Carugo on the natural philosophies of Galileo and Mersenne. In 1969, Crombie and Carugo jointly won the prestigious Galileo prize for the first version of the manuscript, and over the next two and a half decades, the two authors made major additions to the work. The revision process came to an end with the death of Crombie in 1996, and the whereabouts of the typescript became unknown.

The rediscovery of the work allows historians to ask a number of questions about its content, and about the contribution it can still make to the field of the history early modern science. The workshop will address the content of the work and the historical contexts of its composition, as well as the role it played in the careers of its two authors. The conference will celebrate the rediscovery of the document, and it will take place in the Danson Room of Trinity College Oxford on 9 June 2017. All are welcome!

For more information, please click here.

 

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