CfP: LECTIO Doctoral Seminar Jill Kraye

CfP: LECTIO Doctoral Seminar Jill Kraye

Seminar Date: 17 May 2018

Every year, LECTIO awards the LECTIO Chair to a renowned scholar specialized in one of the disciplines studied by LECTIO researchers. Holder of the 2018 LECTIO Chair is Prof. Jill Kraye (Warburg Institute). On Thursday 17 May 2018, she will give a doctoral seminar on “The Humanist as Philosopher and the Philosopher as Humanist”. The aim of this seminar is to explore the collaboration and cross-fertilization between Renaissance humanists and Renaissance philosophers. Although there was a rough division of labour between humanists and philosophers, the disciplinary borders between them were not as rigid as they have sometimes been portrayed in the past. When it came to examining the philosophical traditions which had flourished in antiquity, the boundaries between humanists and philosophers were instead fluid, fluctuating and punctuated by instances of interchange and interaction. Recent research has highlighted the humanist interests of philosophers such as Giovanni Pico della Mirandola and Marsilio Ficino, along with the philosophical interests of humanists such as Angelo Poliziano and Ermolao Barbaro. There is, however, much more evidence to be uncovered in learned treatises, orations, philosophical commentaries, lecture notes, correspondence and the margins of manuscripts and early printed books.

LECTIO invites PhD students and postdocs to submit proposals on the philosophical pursuits of Renaissance humanists, the humanist pursuits of Renaissance philosophers or the collaborations between humanists and philosophers. The timespan is from the 14th to the 17th century, and the geographical area encompasses all of Europe. A one-page description of the proposed paper and a short CV should be submitted no later than 13 April 2018 to lectio@kuleuven.be.

For further information, please click here.

 

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Conference: Locating the Ancient World in Early Modern Subversive Thought

Conference: Locating the Ancient World in Early Modern Subversive Thought

12-14 April 2018, Newcastle University

The aim of this conference at Newcastle University is to expand on this revived appreciation of the classical influence in early modernity by looking specifically at the role played by the ancient world in that sphere from which it has most usually been excluded: subversive literature. The idea that the texts, philosophies, and exempla of the ancient world might have served as significant tools for those who sought to undermine and challenge political, religious and cultural authority stands in direct opposition to the traditional role assigned to the classics in this period. Emphasising an interdisciplinary approach, this conference will draw scholars together to build a coherent picture of how the classical tradition functioned as a tool for subversion, illuminating a previously neglected aspect of the ancient world in the early modern thought.

Featuring keynote speakers Peter Harrison (University of Queensland) and Marianne Pade (Danish Academy at Rome).

There is no delegate fee for this conference, but if you plan to attend please email katherine.east@newcastle.ac.uk to register for the event by Monday 9th April.

For further details, including the programme, please click here.

 

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Conference: Exploring Entangled Histories: Britain and Europe in the Age of the Thirty Years’ War, c.1590-1650

Conference: Exploring Entangled Histories: Britain and Europe in the Age of the Thirty Years’ War, c.1590-1650

12-14 April 2018, Folger Library

All are welcome to attend the “Exploring Entangled Histories: Britain and Europe in the Age of the Thirty Years’ War, c.1590-1650” conference, but you must pre-register for the event by completing the form below.

Registration for the conference closes on March 30, 2018. If you would like to register past this deadline, please email us at the address below to ensure that there is still space available.

Contact us at institute@folger.edu or (202) 675-0333 if issues arise during your registration.

For further info, please see the conference website.

 

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Hobbes Studies 2018 Essay Competition

Hobbes Studies 2018 Essay Competition

Submissions Deadline: 30 May 2018

Hobbes Studies is pleased to invite submissions to the 2018 Hobbes Studies Essay Competition. Submissions should treat the philosophical, political, historical, literary, religious, or scientific aspects of the thought of Thomas Hobbes and be no more than 10,000 words. Essays are invited from researchers in any field who are currently enrolled in postgraduate study or completed their PhD no earlier than 3rd March 2013. Submissions must be received by 30 May 2018. The judges reserve the right not to make an award.

All submissions should be uploaded to the journal’s Editorial Manager website: http://www.editorialmanager.com/hobs/default.aspx.

When submitting your manuscript for consideration, please note in the comments box that you desire to be considered for the 2018 competition (immediately before uploading the files) and include your CV. Submissions must follow Hobbes Studies submission guidelines. For questions, please email the Assistant Editor at hobbesstudies@gmail.com. Essays must not have been previously published or simultaneously submitted for consideration elsewhere.

Submissions will be considered for publication in a forthcoming issue of Hobbes Studies. The competition submission selected by the Editorial Board will be published in Hobbes Studies, awarded €350, and receive a year’s subscription. The 2017 prize winning essay was ‘”A State of Lesser Hope”: The Servant in Hobbes’s Natural Commonwealth’ by Caleb Miller, which will be published in the Autumn issue of Hobbes Studies.

About the Journal Hobbes Studies is an international, peer-reviewed scholarly journal. It publishes research (articles, book symposia, research notes and book reviews) about philosophical, political historical, literary, religious, and scientific aspects of Thomas Hobbes’s thought.

For previous issues, and further info see the Journal’s Website.

 

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CfP: The Pursuit of Legitimacy. Power and its Manifestations in Political History

CfP: The Pursuit of Legitimacy. Power and its Manifestations in Political History (4th Workshop for PhD Candidates in Political History)

25 -26 October 2018, Leiden University

Some political questions are never to be solved. The question of legitimacy is one of these issues that keep pressing themselves on history. How the wielding of political power is justified and contested hangs over the past as an open-ended question. Legitimacy may therefore very well be one of the great themes of political history. In the 4th annual workshop of the Political History PhD Network, PhDs from all over the world are invited to present their work and discuss this crucial question, thereby contributing to new historiographical perspectives on legitimacy.

Throughout history, legitimacy has been a contested concept. It was open to debate and dependent on mediation. As a political question, legitimacy was at play at intersections of different ideological outlooks. The issue of what constitutes a legitimate exercise of power, or a legitimate cause for revolt and resistance, engages all levels and spheres of political activity, from the individual actor to, for instance, the global structures of imperialism. The question of legitimacy therefore touches upon all the core themes of political history, including the topics of continuity and change, the workings of institutions, the dynamics of conflict, the functioning of networks, the spread of ideas, and the performativity of power. In encompassing these subjects, this workshop aims to bring together historians working on diverse periods and places.

The workshop’s central questions are: how did historical actors try to legitimate new capacities of power? How did discourses of legitimacy determine the shape and functioning of political organizations? In what ways was legitimacy depicted, imagined and acted out? How did understandings of legitimacy relate to notions of illegitimacy? How were dominant readings of legitimacy contested? How was legitimacy mediated between different settings and groups of people? Together, these questions should help us to grasp the multitude of ways in which historical actors thought about and engaged with legitimacy as a central issue of political activity.

We encourage applications on topics including (but not limited to) the following areas:

  • Theories of legitimacy
  • Diplomacy and legitimacy
  • Legitimacy in official and societal organizations
  • Discourses and depictions of illegitimacy
  • The legitimacy of violence and political resistance
  • Legitimacy amidst continuity and change

Practical Information:

Proposals for papers should include the title, an abstract of maximum 300 words, and a short CV of the presenter. Please send proposals to phdpolhis@gmail.com before April 1st, 2018. Notification of acceptance will be announced before the end of April. Participants are expected to submit a 3,000 – 5,000 word paper ahead of the workshop by 25 September. A limited amount of funding is available for travel reimbursements. Participants who wish to apply for a reimbursement should indicate this on their application.

For further information and questions please contact us at phdpolhis@gmail.com, join the Political History PhD Network on Linkedin and sign up for our monthly newsletter by writing us an email!

 

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2018 Charles Schmitt Prize Winner

2018 Charles Schmitt Prize Winner

The winner of the 2018 Charles Schmitt Prize is Xiaona Wang, who is a final year PhD student in the Centre for Science, Technology and Innovation Studies, School of Social and Political Science, University of Edinburgh. Her essay is entitled:  ‘By Analogy to the Element of the Stars: The Divine In Jean Fernel’s and William Harvey’s Theories of Generation’, and it will be published in Intellectual History Review later this year.

For more information, please see Intellectual History Review.

 

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CfP: Historicism as a Polemical Concept in the Humanities and Social Sciences, 1890-1980

CfP: Historicism as a Polemical Concept in the Humanities and Social Sciences, 1890-1980

30-31 August 2018, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences

On August 30 and 31, 2018 a conference “Historicism as a Polemical Concept in the Humanities and Social Sciences, 1890-1980” will take place at the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in Amsterdam. The conference is being convened by Herman Paul and Adriaan van Veldhuizen (Leiden University).

The aim is to discuss “historicism” as a polemical concept, asking: “What happens when “historicism” is studied not as a descriptive concept, but as an emotionally charged Kampfbegriff, as employed by a variety of authors in the humanities and social sciences from the 1890s until late into the twentieth century?”

Intellectual historians, cultural historians, historians of science, historians of religion, political historians, philosophers of history and others who are interested in historicism are invited to submit a paper.

Abstracts of 200-300 words are due by February 15 (this is an extended deadline!), 2018, and can be sent to Adriaan van Veldhuizen at a.p.van.veldhuizen@hum.leidenuniv.nl.

For further info, please see the conference website.

 

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Conference: Re-inventing Liberal Universalisms

Conference: Re-inventing Liberal Universalisms

26-27 February 2018, University of Greifswald

Liberalism, even when considered as a manifold and plural political ideology, is still widely regarded as having universal reach in its concepts and arguments. “Universal” here refers to the interweaving of abstract terms assuring continuity throughout fluctuating political agendas. Due to the important role of rationality in liberal anthropology, liberal arguments are also universal and comprehensive in claiming plausibility irrespective of linguistic, cultural or political borders. Still, from a rhetorical perspective, the tension between universal and context-bound claims has remained a constant challenge for liberalism.

Keynote by Prof. Michael Freeden (SOAS University of London and University of Oxford).

Organisers: Working Group Languages and Ideologies. COST Action CA 16211 RECAST: Reappraising Intellectual Debates on Civic Rights and Democracy in Europe, Concepta: International Research School in Conceptual History and Political Thought, Department of Political Science & Communication Studies, University of Greifswald

For further information, see the conference website.

 

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CfP: Locating the Ancient World in Early Modern Subversive Thought

CfP: Locating the Ancient World in Early Modern Subversive Thought

12-14 April 2018, Newcastle University

Dichotomies have long been used to define the intellectual developments of early modern Europe – reason and faith; authority and subversion; science and humanism; radicalism and tradition; heterodoxy and orthodoxy – with classical thought usually located on the side of tradition, a behemoth of learning which inhibited man’s reason and his ability to learn through observation. Such unilinear accounts of the progression to modernity have been subjected to increasingly numerous challenges in the last two decades, as scholars have sought to demonstrate that the ideas which drove Europe towards the Enlightenment were far more complex and multi-layered than suggested by the traditional narratives.

The aim of this conference to be held at Newcastle University is to expand on this revived appreciation of the classical influence in early modernity by looking specifically at the role played by the ancient world in that sphere from which it has most usually been excluded: subversive literature. The idea that the texts, philosophies, and exempla of the ancient world might have served as significant tools for those who sought to undermine and challenge political, religious and cultural authority stands in direct opposition to the traditional role assigned to the classics in this period. Emphasising an interdisciplinary approach, this conference will draw scholars together to build a coherent picture of how the classical tradition functioned as a tool for subversion, illuminating a previously neglected aspect of the ancient world in the early modern thought.

The keynote speakers will be Peter Harrison (University of Queensland) and Marianne Pade (Danish Academy at Rome).

We are inviting abstracts for papers of thirty minutes on topics including, but not limited to:

  • Ancient philosophical involvement in epistemological challenges to traditional understandings of knowledge and belief
  • Ancient theories of natural philosophy in the debates concerning God and the universe in both religion and science
  • The contribution of ancient texts to the arguments for natural religion, and against magic, miracles, and the supernatural
  • Classical rhetoric and literary forms as models for argumentation in subversive treatises, polemics, pamphlets, poetry, and other literary genres
  • Ancient religion in the construction of arguments in favour of toleration, and the establishment of a civil religion
  • The function of ancient examples in radical political ideologies, including republicanism, democracy, and theories of resistance and revolution
  • Classical scholarship as a tool for subversion, and print culture as a sphere facilitating this function of the classics

If you would like to offer a paper for the conference, please submit an abstract of 300 words to katherine.east@ncl.ac.uk by 9th February 2018.

For further information, see the website.

 

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CfP: Aesthetics and Poetics in the History of Political Thought – Cambridge Graduate Conference

CfP: Aesthetics and Poetics in the History of Political Thought

13 June 2018, Cambridge Graduate Conference in Political Thought and Intellectual History

The uneasy distinctions between poetics, aesthetics and politics raise many important issues for historians of political thought. Can we sharply distinguish political and aesthetic concerns throughout history? Are political theories always determined by the languages and conventions in which they are uttered? What relationship does material culture have to the history of political thought? Aiming to explore these and related questions, the organisers of the 11th Annual Cambridge Graduate Conference in Political Thought and Intellectual History, scheduled for Wednesday, June 13, 2018, invite submissions for presentations on the theme ‘Aesthetics and Poetics in the History of Political Thought.’

Topics can include, but are not limited to:

  • the politics of language
  • theories and nature of representation
  • histories of metaphor
  • gender, aesthetics and the political
  • the politics of art and architecture
  • conceptions of imagination and judgment
  • rhetorical strategies in the history of political thought
  • political thought and literature
  • material culture and political thought
  • the politics of cultural practice and exchange
  • national aesthetics
  • collecting and collections
  • authorial self-representation
  • histories of the book
  • illustrations, figures and the aesthetics of textuality

Interested graduate students are asked to send an abstract (max. 500 words) for a 20-minute presentation and a short CV (max. 2 pages) to ptihconf@hermes.cam.ac.uk.

The deadline for proposals is March 1, 2018.

For additional information, please visit the conference website.

 

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  • 2019 ISIH Conference

    2019 ISIH Conference

    #ISIH2019 will take place 5-7 June 2019 at the University of Queensland.